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Ending Persistent Poverty, Respecting all People and our Planet

After the World day of Food (Oct.16), October 17 is the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

The COVID-19 pandemic that gripped the world during the past year has resulted in reversing decades of progress in the fight against poverty and extreme poverty. The threat is not over yet. According to the World Bank, between 88 and 115 million people are being pushed into poverty as a result of the crisis, with the majority of the new extreme poor being found in South Asian and Sub-Saharan countries where poverty rates are already high”. In 2021, this number is expected to have risen to between 143 and 163 million. These ‘new poor’ will join the ranks of the 1.3 billion people already living in multidimensional and persistent poverty who saw their pre-existing deprivations aggravated during the global pandemic. As a matter of fact, the measures imposed to limit the spread of the pandemic often further pushed them into poverty – the informal economy which enables many people in poverty to survive was virtually shut down in many countries.

As we embark on the post-COVID recovery and getting back on track with the Sustainable Development Goals, many are talking of “building back better,” but the message is clear from the people living in extreme poverty that they do not want a return to the past nor to build back to what it was before. They do not want a return to the endemic structural disadvantages and inequalities. Instead, people living in poverty propose to build forward.

Building forward means transforming our relationship with nature, dismantling structures of discrimination that disadvantage people in poverty and building on the moral and legal framework of human rights that places human dignity at the heart of policy and action. Building forward means not only that no one is left behind, but that people living in poverty are actively encouraged and supported to be in the front, engaging in informed and meaningful participation in decision-making processes that directly affect their lives. In building forward, we need to let ourselves be enriched by the wealth of wisdom, energy and resourcefulness that people living in poverty can contribute to our communities, our societies and ultimately to our planet.

Background

In a world characterized by an unprecedented level of economic development, technological means and financial resources, that millions of persons are living in extreme poverty is a moral outrage. Poverty is not solely an economic issue, but rather a multidimensional phenomenon that encompasses a lack of both income and the basic capabilities to live in dignity.

What can I do? What can parish community do to mark this day? In our country where every citizen is being given the basic income for living we take advantage of these things. Let us do something in this area to help people who are suffering. le us do it with gospel charity. Remember the word of Jesus at the last judgment scene, “Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.”(MT 25:40b)

Food is one of the 5 Basic Needs to survive and thrive. Every year World Food Day is observed on October 16 and is celebrated to raise awareness on the issue of hunger and healthy food habits for all. It marks the founding day of the Food and Agriculture Organisation(FAO). World Food Day is celebrated by organisations like the World Food Programme and the International Fund for Agriculture Development. But this year the day will be jointly be led by organisations like FAO, UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, and the World Food Programme (WFP). According to the United Nations, this year’s events will take place in around 150 countries across the world with multiple partners and government involvement.

World Food Day 2021: History

Originally, the day was marked to celebrate the establishment of FAO in the year 1979, as recommended by former Hungarian minister of agriculture and food Dr. Pal Romany. Gradually, over a course of time, it led to raising awareness for hunger, malnutrition, sustainability, and food production.

World Food Day 2021: Significance

This day signifies the anniversary of the founding of the FAO of the United Nations. It also aims to tackle global hunger and eradicate hunger across the globe.

World Food Day 2021: Theme

The theme for World Food Day 2021 is “Safe food now for a healthy tomorrow”. The theme of this year is based on appreciating the individuals who have contributed to creating sustainable surroundings where no one is left hungry. Last year’s theme was based on the suffering of millions of people during the coronavirus pandemic. However, the threat is not over yet.

What can I do? What can parish community do to mark this day? Living in developed country where food is guaranteed, may give us the impression that we don’t care. Think about millions of children who are going to bed every night empty stomach. As individuals and communities let us strive not to waste food. Food is given by God through our labour.

Many people in our district face hunger and thirst. Our local vines do a lot in this field. Let us support vines. I hope there will be something planned for Christmas hamper. As I understand many parishioners who are overseas born are helping many in this area. All inquiries welcome if you wish to help underprivileged people.

Remember the word of Jesus himself at the last judgment scene, “Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers and sisters, you did it to me.”(MT 25:40b).

“So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.”(1 Cor 10:31) Let’s be responsible eaters and sharers.

World Food Day 2021: Messages, and Quotes

Eating is not merely a material pleasure. Eating well gives us a chance to give joy to life and contributes immensely to goodwill and happy companionship. It is of great importance to morale.

There is no loyal love more than the love of food.

Food. It’s not only about nutrients and calories. It’s about sharing. It’s about honesty. It’s about identity.

Feeding the World: Happy World Food Day!

Some people don’t even realize the fact that they are wasting their time in insignificant things and ignoring their l lives i.e. FOOD!!!

“There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.” – Mahatma Gandhi

“Healthy citizens are the greatest asset any country can have.” – Winston Churchill

“Good bread is the most fundamentally satisfying of all foods; good bread with fresh butter, the greatest of feasts!” – James Beard

“Your diet is a bank account. Good food choices are good investments” – Bethenny Frankel.

“Humor keeps us alive. Humor and food. Don’t forget food. You can go a week without laughing.” Joss Whedon

As we are few weeks away from the opening of the Church and the month of November. November is often set apart to remember all loved ones. We encourage all parishioners who would like to offer mass for their loved ones’ to send us an email with all the names of the deceased. The sheet will be printed and placed on the altar to be prayed for at all masses during the month of November.

Dear Parishioners,

As the days lengthen and warm up, there is a sense that life itself becomes a little more open and expansive. We lift our eyes, feel the sun on our skin, look further into the distance and dare to anticipate better, clearer days ahead. As we approach opening of our church in a few weeks, let’s be optimistic.

Plenary Council

The Church in Australia wrapped up the first General Assembly of its 5th Plenary Council on Sunday. 278 designated members from across Australia – including bishops, priests, religious and laypeople – gathered virtually from 3 to 10 October to pray and reflect about the future, the role and relevance of the Catholic Church in Australian society today. Overall, over 300 people joined the event.

In the closing Mass on Sunday, Archbishop Timothy Coleridge SDB of Brisbane, President of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Australia (ACBC), on his part, likened the process to bringing a child to birth: “The process is slow, painful and messy, but in the end it is wonderfully fruitful and joyful as the baby is born,” he said. “Beyond the maelstrom of this week and all that lies ahead, may the Church in Australia come to know the fruitfulness and joy which the Holy Spirit brings from all the pain and mess because nothing is impossible for God”, he concluded in his homily. Check our website to read more.

Confirmation 2021

After many months of rescheduling the celebration of Confirmation, we now have a good news. The sacrament of Confirmation will be celebrated at St. Anne’s Church, on Monday 15th November and Tuesday 16th November at 6:00 pm Mass. Our principal celebrant will be Auxiliary Bishop Anthony Ireland, who is our new regional Bishop.

Due to density quotient restrictions, there will be a limit on how many people can attend each Mass. This is also because the parish is catering for students from St. Anne’s School, St Joachim’s School and other schools in the parish.
So, each family will only be allowed to have 4 fully vaccinated people at Confirmation. (This includes the student making the sacrament in the 4 people). All families have now been contacted. Contact school or parish if you have any questions.

Grace of Waiting- Advent resource

Advent is fast approaching. Now that we know when the church is opening, we will be couple of weeks away from Advent.
The Archdiocese have prepared this weekly reflection to help us prepare to celebrate Jesus. Visit our website to download this resource.

Lecture on Catholic Contribution

An online free of charge series will be presented over six sessions and will explore the development and self-understanding of Roman Catholicism and its contribution culturally, historically and philosophically to the understanding of human nature. For further information and to register for the first lecture please
visit: www.macs.vic.edu.au/Haldane or check our website. The first session was very informative.

Message from the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne

Mandatory vaccinations for Parish Employees and Volunteers. By 26th November, all religious workers, that is, people (paid and volunteers) who work at or in connection with a place of worship will be subject to mandatory vaccination. We request all volunteer in the parish to forward their Vaccination Certificate to the parish office for record keeping.

GREETERS REQUIRED

As we approach opening of our church in a few weeks we need greeter who are double vaccinated. Weekend Masses would be difficult to hold without greeters (now known as COVID Check-in Marshals) to ensure that people are marked off our lists and that they use our QR code to sign in. If you are interested in assisting your parish to have Masses with more than a small number of people in the church, why not help us with being a greeter? Simply email Frank at fbartosy@gmail.com. Training provided.

Stay Safe & God bless

Rev Fr Martin Jeramias

As we approach the opening of our church in a few weeks we need greeters who are double vaccinated, as it is the government regulation. Weekend Masses would be difficult to hold without greeters (now known as COVID Check-in Marshals) to ensure that people are marked off our lists and that they use our QR code to sign in. If you are interested in assisting our parish to have Masses with more than a small number of people in the church, why not help us with being a greeter? Simply email Frank at fbartosy@gmail.com or fill the following form. Training provided.

Plenary Council calls for more listening in Australian Church

This report is prepared by Lisa Zengarini
After a three-year preparatory process, the Fifth Plenary Council of Australia kicked off last week gathering approximately 280 delegates from across the country who met virtually for their first assembly. It is the first such event since 1937 when the Fourth Plenary Council was held. For six days, participants prayed, discussed and reflected together to “discern” what God is asking of the Church in Australia today. Discussions will resume next year at the Second Assembly in Sydney
As Pope Francis launched the global synodal process in Rome, the Church in Australia wrapped up the first General Assembly of its 5th Plenary Council on Sunday.  278 designated members from across Australia – including bishops, priests, religious and laypeople – gathered virtually from 3 to 10 October to pray and reflect about the future, the role and relevance of the Catholic Church in Australian society today. Overall, over 300 people joined the event. The meeting was originally planned in Adelaide in October 2020, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it was postponed to this year and will be followed by a Second Assembly in Sydney in July 2022.

Most important national Catholic gathering in the country since 1937

The Council, which is the most important national Catholic gathering in the country since 1937, was convened by the local bishops in 2016, heeding Pope Francis’ invitation to dialogue with society, in the light of the significant changes that have taken place in Australia over the past decades and also of the findings of the Royal Commission into Institutional Response to Child Sexual Abuse in the Church.

The preparation process

Following Pope Francis’ approval, the preparation process began in 2018, with the launch of “Dialogue and Listening” meetings which were attended by more than 222,000 faithful across the country presenting their contributions. These helped to give a picture of the reality of the Church in Australia today, but also of the concerns and aspirations of Australian Catholics. Once the first phase was completed, the second phase began in June 2019, that of “Listening and discernment”, to identify the issues to be put on the Council’s agenda.

The contributions are summarized in the “Instrumentum Laboris”, the working document released earlier this year. Among the key themes highlighted in the document are strengthening of synodality and pastoral discernment; the call for co-responsibility in the mission and governance of the Church; renewed solidarity of the Australian bishops with the aboriginal peoples and those on the margins of society, and the promotion of integral ecology as indicated by Pope Francis in his Encyclical Letter “Laudato si’” on the care of our common home.

The final Agenda presented in June identified six thematic areas of reflection. These include: conversion, prayer, formation, governance, structures and institutions, which, to be effective, the Agenda says, must be guided by “a renewed missionary spirit”.

A new way of living as Church amid new challenges

During their six-day meetings, the 278 designated members of the Council focused on 16 questions developed as a result of the “listening” phase, which has also been a distinctive feature of this intense week of discernment to find a new way of living as Church in Australia. As explained in the final statement, interventions covered a wide range of the complex realities of the Church and Australian society in this particular moment of history.

Reconciling with abuse victims and First Nations

Delegates listened to the confronting and important voices of victims and survivors of abuse in the Church recalling the “great wounds and failures of the Church and the continuing need to discern pathways of true healing and renewal”. They also heard from Aboriginal peoples, reaffirming the need for reconciliation with Australian Indigenous communities, as well as the need for justice and for the healing of the land through an ‘integral ecology’. In this regard, discussions focused on how the Church in Australia can open, in a new fashion, to “Indigenous ways of being Christian in spirituality, theology, liturgy, and missionary discipleship”. To emphasize this aspect, the opening session of each day began with a “Welcome to Country”, the traditional ceremony where Aboriginal Australians welcome people to their land.

Leadership and governance for a more synodal Church

In responding to the Agenda questions, Members considered ways of living as Church today, focusing on what the Church can offer the world on the one hand, and on how the world can inform the ways and structures of the Church on the other. They reflected on questions of leadership and governance in light of Pope Francis’ call for the Church to be more synodal.

Going out to the margins of society

A key theme of the Assembly was missionary discipleship as well as the call to “go out” to the margins of society. Participants spoke of the ministries of pastoral care and education, health, and aged care, and the many social services and advocacy the Church provides in the Australian community. Various voices drew attention to young people, women, single people, parents and families, people with disabilities, people with diverse experiences of sexuality and gender, and others who feel that there is no place for them in society and Church. Council members discussed how a missionary Church might connect with those who feel distant from the community of faith. They were also reminded of the needs of rural dioceses and parishes, as well as those of large cities, and celebrated the gifts that the Eastern Churches bring to the Catholic community in Australia.

The need for renewal and for “ecclesial listening”

Another highlight of the Assembly was the “call to conversion and fidelity”, as well as to “imagination and renewal”. In this regard, many called attention to the importance of enhancing the role of women in the Church.  A recurring theme was also the need for ongoing processes of “ecclesial listening” which can form and inform how the Church lives its mission today.

Openness to the Holy Spirit

With the closing of this first meeting, the Plenary Council process now enters “a time of prayer, reflection, maturation” leading to the development of new propositions to be presented to the Second Assembly in Sydney. This process will involve continuing reflection by the Members of the Council, and consultation with the wider Church community, the final statement explains. In his concluding address, on October 9, the President of the Plenary Council, Archbishop Timothy Costelloe of Perth, called on its members to “remain open to the promptings of the Holy Spirit” in preparing for the next Assembly, while reiterating the importance of synodality, that is of “walking together” in this process, as requested by Pope Francis.

A slow and messy but fruitful process

In the closing Mass on Sunday, Archbishop Timothy Coleridge SDB of Brisbane, President of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Australia (ACBC), on his part, likened the process to bringing a child to birth: “The process is slow, painful and messy, but in the end it is wonderfully fruitful and joyful as the baby is born,” he said. “Beyond the maelstrom of this week and all that lies ahead, may the Church in Australia come to know the fruitfulness and joy which the Holy Spirit brings from all the pain and mess because nothing is impossible for God”, he concluded in his homily.

 
84 Austin Road, Seaford, Vic, 3198| Suburbs of Seaford, Frankston North, Carrum Downs, Skye and Sandhurst| ☏(03) 9401 6398 ©St Annes Church|
St. Anne’s parish respectfully acknowledges the Bunurong people, who are the traditional custodians od the Boom Wurrung land on which we worship. We acknowledge and pay respect to the Elders past, present and future.
St. Anne’s parish is committed to the safety, wellbeing and human dignity of children, young people and adults.
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